Bathroom Ventilation Options

Bathroom Ventilation Options

In some states, bathroom ventilation fans are required to meet building codes. In California, for example, Title 24 sets guidelines for the overall energy efficiency of new homes and additions. Bathroom ventilation fans are part of the HVAC systems that must be evaluated for energy efficiency under Title 24 before building permits can be issued.
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Bathroom Ventilation Options

Keep in mind that properly vented ventilation fans also suck a lot of heated air out of your house. A remedy is to install a heat-exchange ventilator fan. These fans use warm, outgoing air to heat cooler, incoming replacement air. Heat exchanger models sell for about twice as much as standard bathroom ventilation fans.
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Bathroom Ventilation Options

Many of today’s bathroom ventilation fans feature quiet motors that let them perform at extremely low noise levels. These same motors are designed for energy efficiency. Panasonic’s WhisperGreen line of ventilation fans, for example, employ a DC (direct current) motor that’s quieter and more energy-efficient than EnergyStar criteria.
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Bathroom Ventilation Options

Step One // How to Install a Bathroom Vent Fan Bath Vent Overview Photo by Keller & Keller Photography A bathroom without a ventilation fan is like a fireplace without a chimney: If you fail to pull the moisture generated in the bathroom out of there, it will migrate into the walls and grow mold and mildew, or blister paint and peel wallpaper. One reason many households still don’t have bath fans is that they can be intimidating to install. That’s why we asked This Old House general contractor Tom Silva to show us how. The bathroom here is below an accessible attic, so Tom ran the exhaust duct across the attic and out a gable end. Bath vent fans are rated by how many cubic feet of air they can move in one minute, known as the CFM rating. To determine which size fan to buy for your bath, multiply the room’s square footage by 1.1. For example, a 100-square-foot bath would require a 110 CFM-rated fan. Fan’ also have a sound rating, measured in sones. (A modern refrigerator operates at about one sone.) Vent fans range from as low as 0.5 sone up to about 6.0 sones. You’ll find both the CFM and sone ratings printed on the vent fan’s box.
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Bathroom Ventilation Options

This article series describes how to install bathroom ventilation systems, fans, ducts, terminations. We include bathroom venting code citations and the text also explains why bathroom vent fans are needed and describes good bath vent fan choices, necessary fan capacity, and good bath vent fan and vent-duct installation details. We discuss bathroom exhaust vent codes, specifications, advice.
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Bathroom Ventilation Options

A bathroom is an ideal place for mold to take root. It is moist, warm, and can remain in that state for quite a while if there is no ventilation. A bathroom exhaust fan is one of the best ways to keep the humidity in your bathroom at a comfortable level and keep mold at bay. Use it in conjunction with a device that measures humidity and you’ll be able to keep your bathroom dry and mold free.
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Bathroom Ventilation Options

A bathroom without a ventilation fan is like a fireplace without a chimney: If you fail to pull the moisture generated in the bathroom out of there, it will migrate into the walls and grow mold and mildew, or blister paint and peel wallpaper. One reason many households still don’t have bath fans is that they can be intimidating to install. That’s why we asked This Old House general contractor Tom Silva to show us how. The bathroom here is below an accessible attic, so Tom ran the exhaust duct across the attic and out a gable end.
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Bathroom Ventilation Options

A bathroom without a ventilation fan is like a fireplace without a chimney: If you fail to pull the moisture generated in the bathroom out of there, it will migrate into the walls and grow mold and mildew, or blister paint and peel wallpaper. One reason many households still don’t have bath fans is that they can be intimidating to install. That’s why we asked This Old House general contractor Tom Silva to show us how. The bathroom here is below an accessible attic, so Tom ran the exhaust duct across the attic and out a gable end. Bath vent fans are rated by how many cubic feet of air they can move in one minute, known as the CFM rating. To determine which size fan to buy for your bath, multiply the room’s square footage by 1.1. For example, a 100-square-foot bath would require a 110 CFM-rated fan. Fan’ also have a sound rating, measured in sones. (A modern refrigerator operates at about one sone.) Vent fans range from as low as 0.5 sone up to about 6.0 sones. You’ll find both the CFM and sone ratings printed on the vent fan’s box.
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Bathroom ventilation fans have different air flow capacities, measured in cubic feet per minute (cfm). To get the right fan for your bathroom, use the guidelines set by the Home Ventilating Institute: Your fan should have 1 cfm for every square foot of floor space in your bathroom.
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We explain how to install bathroom exhaust fans or vents, the vent ducting, the vent termination at the wall, soffit or roof, vent fan wiring, bath vent duct insulation, bath vent lengths, clearances, routing, and we answer just about any other bathroom ventilation design or installation question you may have. We discuss bath vent routing, insulation, slope, termination, airflow rate requirements and other specifications.
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Hi SLS, I have had problems with centrifugal inline fans installed in my bathroom which have all periodically failed. To summarise; my bathroom is in the centre of a middle floor flat and the ducting consists of the following : 3m of 100m diameter flexible aluminium hose run from bathroom ceiling down adjacent wall. From bottom of wall the ducting opens unto 150mm diameter and runs 4m under floorboards. The ducting run then goes up behind outer wall in 3m (still 150mm) and connects to grilled outer exhaust. So basically the ducting is approx 11m in total length with 5 bends in the system. The first fan installed was an Acoustic Mini Box 150mm inline centrifugal fan (link removed) this failed after 2 years usage (not sure on failure since was out of warranty, but no problems with moisture etc on connections). I then installed a second fan which was TD-SILENT Acoustic Inline Mixed Flow Duct Fan 150mm (link removed). This has failed consistently after 4months usage a total of 2 times, I basically have sent it back and got a new replacement each time and they have told me failure not condensation of electrics but motor failure. The third fan replacement has just failed after 4-5months usage. I am not sure what to do next are all these failures due to the long ducting? Would you recommend the ducting is replaced with a straight run from bathroom through the bedroom next door into external wall? (no access to ceiling in bedroom since bathroom has suspended ceiling, hence why the ducting was run through walls and below floor to avoid run across bedroom) Or have i just been really unlucky with the fans and get a different more reliable inline centrifugal fan which you can recommend? By the way all the fans were connected to turn on and off with the light switch but had option for timer so terminals looped to bypass this. Also I have observed that when the fans were working I could see steam coming outside from grille when fan was on during shower. Would really like your advise Im stuck! Thanks Jason
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Fortunately, you have a friend and defender—the bathroom exhaust ventilation fan. This little workhorse removes excess moisture, odors and even mold spores that can lead to health problems. In some areas, exhaust fans are required by building codes, especially if there’s no operable window.
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The model codes are specifying the minimum bathroom vent fan capacity needed. If your bathroom includes a steam bath, steam shower, or jetted tub, sources of additional moisture, you will need to increase the total bathroom exhaust vent capacity in CFM. Industry experts recommend 60 cfm to 80 cfm for small bathrooms and 200 to 300 cfm for a large bathroom with a steam generator. And if your vent fan ducting is long or includes bends that too will require added fan capacity.
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Flexible plastic vent fan ductwork: shown at above left is a common use of un insulated, flexible ventilation fan duct. In this installation the duct is improperly installed, spilling directly into the attic space of the building. This duct material is least costly at the time of installation but may be most costly when a combination of accumulated condensation and duct damage leaks into the building insulation or ceiling cavity.
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Good morning – There are numerous types out there made from vinyl, brass, stainless to galvanized which you can paint to blend in, in many cases. The traditional ones with the cover sticking out at an angle don’t blend as well as one with a few louvers that sticks out maybe by an inch. You definitely want one with a damper or louvers that close when the fan is not in use. For those that have exhaust only types of ventilation systems, they can get by with one without any louvers and there the choices are more numerous. I would try looking for exhaust wall vent cover

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