Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

Remove the Old Sink Before you begin, snap a picture of your plumbing configuration. This serves as a handy reference if you’re having trouble reassembling the plumbing later. Step 1 Turn off both the hot and cold water supply lines. The shutoff valves typically are in the cabinet below the sink or in the basement. If you cannot find them, turn off the main water line to the house. Step 2 Turn on the faucet to relieve water pressure in the lines. Step 3 Use adjustable wrenches to disconnect the water supply lines to the faucet. Have a small bucket ready to catch any water left in the supply lines and drainpipes as they are removed. Good to KnowLeave the faucet attached to the sink. You can remove both the sink and the faucet as one unit. Step 4 If you have a garbage disposer, turn off the circuit, then unplug it. Use pliers to disconnect the drainpipe and P-trap from the sink drain. Keep a bucket or pan underneath the drain to catch excess water. Step 5 Then remove the dishwasher drain line. Step 6 Remove the disposer following the manufacturer’s instructions. If you don’t have your disposer instructions, check the manufacturer’s website. Have a bucket ready to catch any water. Most disposers loosen at the mounting bracket connection to the sink drain and twist off. Step 7 Locate the metal clips under the counter around the sink’s perimeter. Loosen them with a screwdriver, open-end wrench or socket wrench and swing them toward the sink bowl. Step 8 Cut the caulk around the sink with a utility knife. Step 9 Push the unit from underneath and lift the old sink away. Step 10 Use a putty knife to remove grime, caulk and old plumber’s putty from the countertop. Likewise, clean any components you will re-install.
kitchen sink drain diagram 1

Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

Prepare for the New Kitchen Sink Before you begin this project, read the manufacturer’s instructions and follow all local building codes. If you’re not comfortable installing a kitchen sink or related components (faucets and garbage disposers), Lowe’s can do it for you. Select the appropriate type of replacement sink. Single- and double-bowl drop-in sinks can be installed into most countertop surfaces. Undermount sinks install beneath the counter and should only be used with solid-surface and natural or engineered stone countertops. These instructions are for installing a drop-in sink. Step 1 Measure your existing sink. If your new sink has different dimensions and drain location(s) than the unit it will replace, you may need to modify the countertop opening and / or plumbing. Good to KnowFor best results, make a drawing of your old sink with all measurements including distances from the sink wall to the drain center to use as a shopping aid and reference. Or you can remove your old sink, take it to Lowe’s, and ask a Lowe’s associate to help you select a replacement unit. CautionWear safety glasses when working under the sink or cutting pipe and other materials. Step 2 Decide if you will also replace the faucet or install additional components such as a sprayer, soap dispenser, on-demand hot water tap or filtered water tap.Standard sinks have 1, 2, 3 or 4 holes on the rear lip for a faucet and additional components.Installation of a new faucet and other components is easier if it is done when you are installing a new sink, since you can easily access the hardware with the sink out of the countertop.
kitchen sink drain diagram 2

Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

In order to better understand just how all of this fits together, have a look at the above diagram. It contains nearly everything we covered in this article about “How to Install a Kitchen Sink Drain.”  Note that the diagram shows a dishwasher “waste nib” this is  sometimes referred to as a dishwasher “barb” connector. Since, I have not mentioned this type of connector  in this article, I plan to cover it, in more detail in a future “How to Install a Dishwasher” post. The diagram is for a typical single kitchen or laundry tub installation. You will need to modify it a bit if you are installing a dual kitchen sink.
kitchen sink drain diagram 3

Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

The company who installed my dishwasher did not put in a high loop. There is a lot of surplus drain hose between the dishwasher and the drain of the sink, and this surplus is coiled around like a big long snake under my kitchen sink. I just screwed the hose to the underside of my counter top which gets it as high as it can go but there is a lot of surplus hose…which side of the “high loop” should the surplus be on? 1. hose comes from dishwasher to high loop then dips down again toward the floor, then goes up again to the point where it enters the kitchen sink drain or 2. hose comes from dishwasher and coils around on the floor, then goes up to the high loop, then proceeds directly to point where it enters the kitchen sink drain? Thanks for the info!!! My dishwasher since installed has smelled bad after a wash (about 4 – 5 hours after it is done the wash a bad fishy smell comes about inside the dishwasher – a fairly new one: LG; LDF7932ST. I’m hoping this high loop thing will get rid of the smell. If I leave the dishes in there too long after a wash they take on the smell!
kitchen sink drain diagram 4

Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

There aren't many reasons for changing out the drain pipes under a kitchen sink, but one of the most common is during a kitchen renovation when the sink is being replaced. The steps for installing the sink drain will depend on how different the new sink is from the old one, as well as what other components are being installed. In older homes, the new sink may not be a different depth than the old one, so some alteration of the drain pipes may be necessary.
kitchen sink drain diagram 5

Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

I suddenly have a slow draining kitchen sink. The dishwasher backs up into it and sometimes when I run the disposal it backs up into the other side, It goes down but not like it used to. I did notice that my dishwasher drain line was just draped across under the sink and installed into the drain for the disposal free sink. (rental house) I took every pipe fitting I could apart and have snaked everything including the vent pipe outside on the roof. I am not finding much in the pipes. When I take the plug out of the bottom of the trap, water drains just fine from both sides of the sink. When I put it back and run water in the sink, it comes out into the dishwasher drain line and some comes out of the plug opening. It’s acting more like an air pressure problem than a clog, but I’m out of ideas of what to do next and I can’t afford a plumber. I doubt landlord would pay it. Thoughts please?
kitchen sink drain diagram 6

Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

I’m installing a new dishwasher, and was wondering about best location for the drain line. The old installation had the drain line entering the top of the cabinet to go to the sink drain. But with the new dishwasher this pinches the drain line behind the machine. I am thinking of drilling a new hole at the bottom of the cabinet, where the dishwasher won’t pinch it, then I can do the high loop inside the sink cabinet. Does that work? Or should I just keep the original drain line hole? Thanks!
kitchen sink drain diagram 7

Kitchen Sink Drain Diagram

I just installed a Whirlpool DW and for the most part I think I followed all the directions. Before shoving the DW back into place and securing it in place with screws, I wanted to run it for a couple of minutes and then stop it and hit drain. Because part of the drain pipe is that white semi-transparent plastic, I could see that after the drain ended there was still some water in the drain pipe. It’s a new DW and the water used for this “test” was obviously clean. So I have 2 questions.. First, is there suppose to be water in the drain pipe after the DW is finished running a full cycle? And secondly, wouldn’t that water that gets trapped or left over in the drain pipe normally be dirty water?
kitchen sink drain diagram 8

I just installed a Whirlpool DW and for the most part I think I followed all the directions. Before shoving the DW back into place and securing it in place with screws, I wanted to run it for a couple of minutes and then stop it and hit drain. Because part of the drain pipe is that white semi-transparent plastic, I could see that after the drain ended there was still some water in the drain pipe. It’s a new DW and the water used for this “test” was obviously clean. So I have 2 questions.. First, is there suppose to be water in the drain pipe after the DW is finished running a full cycle? And secondly, wouldn’t that water that gets trapped or left over in the drain pipe normally be dirty water? Thx for help.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *