Kitchen Window Shelf

Kitchen Window Shelf

Black thumb be damned, I love filling my home with plants. Prickly cactus, chubby-leaved succulents and sprawling ivy are my favorite types of greenery. Mainly because they are the easiest to care for, and I don’t have the best track record. In spite of my plant-murdering ways, I clearly see the benefits of houseplants. They are beautiful, they clean the air, and they can even improve your mood. It seems like every other day I’m vacuuming soil and nursing a broken plant back into a tipped pot. Thanks, cats! I created these built-in clear shelves to get my plants off my windowsill and, bonus, I was able to add a lot more color and greenery into my life. These minimal shelves provide lots of direct light, so they’re great for cacti, succulents and herbs. And while they don’t block too much light, they provide a bit of privacy, too. These shelves work great for smaller windows. This one is about 24 inches wide. I chose to use acrylic for my shelves because it’s lightweight, safer than glass (since these are not screwed in), and easy to remove to clean. You could easily substitute wood for the brackets — painted to match your window — and glass for the shelves. The acrylic does bow a bit with the weight of the plants. If you’d like to display heavier objects or if you have wider windows I’d suggest using tempered glass, which you can easily get cut to size with finished edges at a professional glass shop. —Jessica Marquez  Materials – Measuring tape – Painter’s tape – Acrylic shelf (you can get acrylic sheets cut and brackets cut to size here) – Acrylic square rod “brackets” (These are not traditional brackets, but are easy to install and support the shelf like a traditional bracket would.) – 9/64 drill bit – Ruler – Pencil – Level – Sheet Metal Screws, size 6 x 1 1/4 Instructions Step 1 Using a measuring tape, measure the width and depth of your window. My window was 24 5/8 x 4.5″. I wanted the shelves to fit flush into the window, so I made sure the measurement was just a hair shy of the full width. To save a bit on the cost of materials, I got 4″ deep shelves, instead of 4.5″. In total, I got four 1/4″ thick acrylic shelves cut at Canal Plastic Center along with nine 5/8″ x 4″ square acrylic rods. Step 2 Using painter’s tape, plan the layout of your shelves. Allow for some room for your plants to grow. Step 3 Drill two holes in support brackets. To speed up the drill process, I taped the bracket pieces side by side onto a piece of scrap wood and marked on the tape the center point where the holes would be drilled. NOTE: If you are using acrylic brackets drill very slowly! As you’re drilling, pull the drill bit out every few seconds. The drill bit heats up as you drill and can melt the acrylic if you drill too fast without breaks. I had a craft fail with my first drill bit, which got permanently stuck in the acrylic. Glad I ordered one extra bracket piece.  Step 4 Mark where your brackets will be installed on one side of the windowsill. With a ruler and level, mark a level line along the depth of the window sill. Measure from the bottom up using your taped window guide as a reference point. Once you have your level measurement for the first bottom shelf, you can measure up from there. Each of my shelves were 13″ apart. Step 5 Mark the opposite side of the windowsill where the brackets will be installed. Start with the bottom shelf. Use a leveled shelf lined up with your previous marks on the opposite side of the windowsill to create a level line along the depth of the windowsill. Once you have the level mark for the bottom shelf, you can measure up from there using the same distance between shelves as you did on the opposite side. Remember to level each shelf. Step 6 Drill in screws. It helps to screw in one side halfway, level the bracket, and screw in the other side. Then you can completely drill in both screws. Repeat this step for all of your brackets. Now you’re ready to drop in your shelves, which rest right on the brackets and decorate. Print
kitchen window shelf 1

Kitchen Window Shelf

Spice up your kitchen with an easy window herb garden! Where there’s a window, there’s a way to garden. Window herb garden is always a good idea! See our shelves windows collection an start to create a scaled-down gardening spot. When space is limited, finding room for plants can be impossible. But no matter your style, space, or budget, you can devise a strategy for success just by simplifying your requirements. Glass shelves above a deep window sill invite in light while helping to screen the view of a neighbor’s house. Transform a window into a mini-greenhouse where herbs, houseplants, and even little pots of grass will thrive. For best results, choose a large inset window that receives lots of light. Can’t wait till this is done in our kitchen! It is a pleasure to see this window in the spring when everything is blooming. It would definitively change the atmosphere in your room! also view: 35 Indoor Garden Ideas to Green Your Home
kitchen window shelf 2

Kitchen Window Shelf

Thomas J. Story Pinterest PagesPrevious 29 of 52 Next View All Simple window shelf A single shelf in an unexpected place can expand your storage right where you need it most. This one in front of a kitchen window frees counter space and keeps cooking ingredients handy. Colorful often-used items are grouped together for a visual display on top of an antique cabinet. Cooking utensils, beans and spices, small tools, and a chalkboard for posting reminders lend warmth.
kitchen window shelf 3

Kitchen Window Shelf

PagesPrevious 29 of 52 Next View All Simple window shelf A single shelf in an unexpected place can expand your storage right where you need it most. This one in front of a kitchen window frees counter space and keeps cooking ingredients handy. Colorful often-used items are grouped together for a visual display on top of an antique cabinet. Cooking utensils, beans and spices, small tools, and a chalkboard for posting reminders lend warmth.
kitchen window shelf 4

Kitchen Window Shelf

Simple window shelf A single shelf in an unexpected place can expand your storage right where you need it most. This one in front of a kitchen window frees counter space and keeps cooking ingredients handy. Colorful often-used items are grouped together for a visual display on top of an antique cabinet. Cooking utensils, beans and spices, small tools, and a chalkboard for posting reminders lend warmth.
kitchen window shelf 5

Kitchen Window Shelf

Regarding the bowing issue of acrylic shelves for this project: if you add 1.5″ to the depth of the shelves, you can have your plastics vendor heat bend 3/4″ down along both long edges of the shelf. That will make a much sturdier shelf. It may have a slightly bulkier appearance, but I’d say that’s better than coming home to a broken shelf and pots, plants, and dirt all over the carpet. When ordering your acrylic, you can specify “fire polished edges” to make sure the edges are smooth and shiny.
kitchen window shelf 6

Kitchen Window Shelf

what a fabulous idea. I used to have plastic tray shelves hung by 2 hooks and heavy white braided string. The shelves would shift a lot over time because of the design, so I just got rid of them but missed the space for plants. We have a double window over our sink, so approximately 46″ between the wall cabinets. I think I can make this work by just putting a shelf bracket on the wood center piece between the 2 windows. I think I would also use screws counter sunk into the wood rather than finishing nails. A lot sturdier and you can unscrew the shelf anytime without using a hammer to pry off the wood pieces that could damage your cabinets in the process.
kitchen window shelf 7

Kitchen Window Shelf

Mark where your brackets will be installed on one side of the windowsill. With a ruler and level, mark a level line along the depth of the window sill. Measure from the bottom up using your taped window guide as a reference point. Once you have your level measurement for the first bottom shelf, you can measure up from there. Each of my shelves were 13″ apart.
kitchen window shelf 8

Using a measuring tape, measure the width and depth of your window. My window was 24 5/8 x 4.5″. I wanted the shelves to fit flush into the window, so I made sure the measurement was just a hair shy of the full width. To save a bit on the cost of materials, I got 4″ deep shelves, instead of 4.5″. In total, I got four 1/4″ thick acrylic shelves cut at Canal Plastic Center along with nine 5/8″ x 4″ square acrylic rods.
kitchen window shelf 9

A single shelf in an unexpected place can expand your storage right where you need it most. This one in front of a kitchen window frees counter space and keeps cooking ingredients handy. Colorful often-used items are grouped together for a visual display on top of an antique cabinet. Cooking utensils, beans and spices, small tools, and a chalkboard for posting reminders lend warmth.

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