No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink

No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink

Search Add New Question My bathroom has great cold water pressure but very little hot water pressure. Could it be the faucet? wikiHow Contributor Hot water comes through the gas/electrical heater. Pipes within the heater may be clogged by calcium deposits reducing the flow. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 23 Helpful 54 When I flush the toilet or run the washing machine, the water pressure in the rest of the house is reduced dramatically. What should I do? wikiHow Contributor Change your line to one with a bigger diameter. Also, install separate lines from tanks for more than four taps. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 18 Helpful 40 My bathroom hot water suddenly increased in pressure. This happened after a loud bang with orange water coming out of the faucet, followed by black water. Where do I look for the problem? wikiHow Contributor It sounds like your hot water line was partially clogged and the clog spontaneously broke apart. That explains the increase in pressure and the loud noise. You have dark water because the clog is now flowing out of your pipes as a dark particulate. The dark water should clear out fairly soon — a few days at most, if you use that faucet regularly. If things don’t improve soon, you should contact a plumber to diagnose and fix the problem. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 8 Helpful 19 Recently, I had my town shut off the main valve outside so a plumber could change my main valve, but why is my water pressure now so awful? wikiHow Contributor Your new main valve and/or the city side shutoff valve may be partially closed. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 24 Helpful 38 I’ve cleaned the kitchen sink cartridge due to low pressure in only certain taps; it worked great for 10 minutes or so, then there was low pressure again. So I cleaned cartridge again, removing tons of what I think was calcium. What can I do? wikiHow Contributor It sounds like you have hard water. A water softening system may be needed. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 3 Helpful 7 A service person shut off the main water line briefly to repair our refrigerator. He completed the repair, then turn the main water back on. Since then it takes a minute or more to get hot water from any faucet in the house. Prior to the refrigerator repair we had hot water immediately. What can I do? wikiHow Contributor There may be air in the hot water heater if the hot water was turned on while the main was off. This, however, usually causes sputtering and not a delay in hot water. In industrial applications, a recirculation pump is used to keep hot water cycling through the hot water heater (boiler), thus keeping hot water readily available. I have never seen this in a house, but maybe something creative was done in your home. Perhaps most likely is that some insulation was removed somewhere on your hot water lines. Replace that, and your problem should be solved. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 5 Helpful 5 I have had my water pressure drop in the kitchen approximately one month after installing a new faucet. The pressure in the rest of the house is fine. What can I do? wikiHow Contributor Remove the aerator of the faucet and clean it. The aerator is the small cap where the water comes out of the faucet — it usually has a screen. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 16 Helpful 7
no water pressure in kitchen sink 1

No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink

A GREAT many kitchen sinks are equipped with faucets that have separate spray attachments connected to the base of the faucet under the sink. These are designed so that pushing down on a lever or valve on the spray head diverts water from the regular spout to the spray head, which is attached to a flexible hose so it can be pulled out and moved around inside the sink. When this spray no longer works properly, or when it works only spasmodically, most people mutter under their breath and then simply stop using this attachment, figuring that there is little they can do about the problem without calling in a high-priced plumber, or replacing the faucet entirely. However, repairs are usually quite simple to make once you understand how this device works. Replacement parts, when needed, are widely available in many hardware stores, as well as in all plumbing supply outlets. The mechanism that controls the flow of water is a small valve called a diverter valve. It is situated inside the body of the faucet, usually directly under the base of the swing spout, as shown in the drawing. It can move up and down inside its chamber, much like a piston, and is activated only by water pressure on each side of the piston. When the spray head is not in use, pressure is equal on both sides of the piston so the valve allows all water to flow past it and out through the regular faucet spout. However, when the lever or valve is pressed to activate the spray, an imbalance of pressure is created inside the diverter assembly (more pressure on one side of the piston than on the other) and this causes the piston to move down and close the opening leading to the faucet spout. All water then flows through the hose that leads to the spray head (in some cases a small trickle of water will continue to flow out of the faucet spout). If the water is not diverted to the spray head when you press down the spray lever or button, so that most of it is still coming out of the faucet spout, the first thing you should check is the strainerand-aerator assembly on the end of the faucet spout. Dirt or sediment in this unit could be creating a back-pressure that keeps the diverter valve inside the faucet from operating properly. The simplest way to check for this is to take the aerator completely off (it unscrews easily). Then try the spray again with this off. If the spray now works fine, then you know the aerator needs cleaning or replacing – chances are the little screen on the inside may be partly clogged with dirt, or sediment may have become caked inside the little holes around the inside rim of the aerator. You can usually clean it by holding it upside down under a strong stream of water to backflush it. But if you can’t get it really clean, replace it with a new one. When your test (without the aerator) indicates that this is not the source of the problem, the next thing to check is the openings on the spray head itself to see if it is clogged or broken. Usually the nozzle can be unscrewed so that you can clean it by running water through it in reverse; otherwise you may be able to clean the holes out with a round wooden toothpick. If you are unable to clean it out, or if the head is cracked or broken and therefore leaks when in use, then you should replace it with a new one. The old one can be unscrewed from the end of the hose, and the new one screwed on its place. If neither the faucet aerator nor the spray head is the cause of the trouble, the next item you should suspect is the hose under the sink that connects the faucet body to the spray head. Make sure it is not binding or kinking when you pull the spray head up out of its socket on the sink top, and make sure the hose is not split or cracked at any point. If it is, buy a new one and replace it (the hose has a threaded fitting at each end, so it is not difficult to unscrew). When none of the steps taken thus far have solved the problem, then you know that the trouble is in the diverter valve assembly. Shut off the water and unscrew the threaded collar at the base of the spout, then lift the spout off completely. In the opening under the spout you will see the stem of the diverter valve sticking straight up (see drawing). Grasp this with your fingers, or with a small pair of pliers, and lift it straight out; then take it to your local hardware store and buy a new one that matches. Before installing the new diverter valve, put the spout on temporarily (without the diverter valve in place) and turn the hot water on for a minute or so to flush out any dirt that may be trapped inside. Now shut the water off and remove the spout again, then drop the new diverter valve into place (with the stem pointing up) and replace the swing spout in it original position. Answering the Mail Q. Several years ago our wood kitchen cabinets were painted with a good-quality semigloss enamel. Cleaning has dulled the finish, so the cabinets need painting to restore the sheen. Is there something we can apply on top of the new paint that will help preserve the appearance and thus make maintenance easier? -S.C.M., Westport, Conn. A. You could apply a coat of wax over the paint after a week or so, but I should warn you this will make repainting more difficult next time. Every bit of the wax will have to be removed first, otherwise the new paint will not dry or adhere properly. A high-gloss enamel will hold its sheen better than a semigloss and is more stainresistant. You should also try using a milder detergent when you wash the paint – strong detergents attack finishes more than milder ones do, and those that contain a lot of ammonia will dull the finish more than other cleaners do. Q. Two years ago my roses had black spot disease, so I sprayed them with a special fungicide sold by garden supply houses to get rid of this. Now the cedar siding on the house has black spots, so I tried spraying with the same fungicide, but it helped only slightly and the problem seems to be spreading. What do you suggest? – V.L., Westport, Conn. A. I don’t know about roses, but I do know that the black spots on the house are undoubtedly mildew. You can get rid of this by scrubbing with a solution of one part liquid laundry bleach and four parts water. Wear rubber gloves to protect your hands. Scrub on and let dry, then hose off with plenty of water. Though this will get rid of the mildew, it won’t prevent it from coming back. More sunlight will help, so prune large shrubs and trees near the house. ——————————————————————— Questions about home repair problems should be addressed to Bernard Gladstone, The New York Times, 229 West 43d Street, New York, N.Y. 10036. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; unpublished letters cannot be answered individually. Illustrations: diagram

No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink

No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink
No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink
No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink
No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink
No Water Pressure In Kitchen Sink

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *